Sigourney Weaver to Host Lincoln Center Awards for Emerging Artists

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts has announced that two-time Golden Globe winner and Oscar and Tony nominee Sigourney Weaver will host its upcoming Lincoln Center Awards for Emerging Artists presentation on March 1. The evening will honor winners from across the performing arts, including filmmakers, musicians, and theatre artists.

Weaver joins Katherine Brown, Danny Burstein, Laura Osnes, and Desmond Richardson, who will perform at the ceremony. The awards night will be held at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse.

The 2017 winners are Calidore String Quartet (Chamber Music Society); filmmaker Dustin Guy Defa (Film Society of Lincoln Center); soprano Kiera Duffy (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts); dancer Joseph Gordon (New York City Ballet); violinist and concertmaster Frank Huang (New York Philharmonic); violinist Paul Huang (The Juilliard School); playwright Michael R. Jackson (Lincoln Center Theater); saxophonist Julian Lee (Jazz at Lincoln Center); singer-songwriter-actress Grace McLean (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts); baritone Yunpeng Wang (The Metropolitan Opera); director, producer, and performer Ben West (The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); and dancer Andres Zuniga (School of American Ballet).

The awardees we honor this year follow in the steps of former honorees, such as the great cellist Alisa Weilerstein, renowned choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, and Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras. The members of this class have already contributed great works of music, theater, dance, and film to the Lincoln Center campus and beyond, and we are delighted to help them pursue new projects that will undoubtedly challenge, stimulate, and inspire us,” commented William H. Donaldson, co-chair of the Emeritus Board of Lincoln Center, in a press statement.

Source: playbill.com

The Assignment Official Trailer (2017)

Dian Fossey story in production for National Geographic, Sigourney Weaver to narrate

The work of legendary gorilla scientist Dian Fossey will be brought back to life in a new three-part documentary series for National Geographic television, now in production. Scheduled to air this fall, the series will feature narration by actress Sigourney Weaver, who played Dian Fossey in the 1988 movie “Gorillas in the Mist,” based on Fossey’s book.
I had the amazing experience of portraying Dian Fossey in ‘Gorillas in the Mist,’ spending months with the majestic mountain gorillas,” says Weaver, who also serves as the honorary chair of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund.

In the 50 years since Dian founded the Karisoke Research Center, scientists have safeguarded the gorillas and increased awareness about conservation all around the world. I am honored to be working with the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and National Geographic on what promises to be a remarkable documentary of Dian’s courageous life and legacy.
Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund President and CEO/Chief Scientist, Dr. Tara Stoinski, says there couldn’t be a better time to re-tell the story of Fossey’s work, which has since been greatly expanded and has helped the critically endangered mountain gorilla population to grow and stabilize.
The Fossey Fund has not only carried on the important gorilla protection and scientific research that Fossey started, but has expanded it to include helping local communities, building the next generation of conservationists in Africa, and helping other gorilla species in danger of extinction,” says Dr. Stoinski.
The National Geographic special will be a definitive biography of Fossey’s work, life, death and legacy, and will include never-before-seen footage from both National Geographic and Fossey Fund archives, a fitting endeavor for this 50th anniversary of her work,” adds Dr. Stoinski
In addition, the series, titled “Dian Fossey: Secrets in the Mist,” will include footage shot recently of the mountain gorillas in Rwanda and with Fossey Fund field staff. Tigress Productions, the company producing the series, is filming an historic group of gorillas who were among the first studied by Dian Fossey. Originally named Group 5, the group split in 1995, with one of the offshoots being the modern day Pablo’s group. Pablo’s group’s most famous member is elderly silverback Cantsbee – the last of the silverbacks first seen and named by Dian Fossey and then monitored throughout his 38 years. Amazingly, Cantsbee suddenly reappeared on Jan. 4, after being missing for months and presumed dead, adding yet another chapter to the amazing story of these gorillas and Fossey’s legacy.
Tigress Productions also produced the 2007 documentary on silverback Titus, which aired on PBS “Nature” in 2008.
“Dian Fossey: Secrets in the Mist” is also being produced in partnership with Academy-Award-winning executive producer James Marsh. It will air globally in 171 countries and in 45 languages this fall.

Source: gorillafund.org

 

The Defenders first look: Meet Sigourney Weaver’s villain — and learn her name

Come as you are, Defenders. There’s a new enemy in town.

Meet Sigourney Weaver’s Alexandra, the villain of Marvel’s The Defenders impressive enough to draw the attention of Daredevil (Charlie Cox), Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter), Luke Cage (Mike Colter), and Iron Fist (Finn Jones). She’s an “utter badass,” showrunner Marco Ramirez says of the character, who is the perfect fit for the Sigourney Weaver, of Alien and Avatar fame. “Sigourney is the kind of person you can buy as the smartest person in the room, who you can also buy as a person holding a flamethrower. Her character is a very powerful force in New York City. She’s everything Sigourney is: sophisticated, intellectual, dangerous.” He pauses. “I’m sorry. I can only say a bunch of adjectives right now.

A flurry of adjectives sounds about right for Alexandra, and not just because Marvel’s keeping further details about her character under tight wraps, so much so that probing Ramirez for more on Weaver’s character is like trying to stick a needle through Luke Cage’s unbreakable skin. After all, she (or whatever she’s fighting for) has to walk a very difficult, spoiler-ific line when it comes to the team-up series. “We knew it would take something massive to pull these four characters from their individual worlds to work together,” Ramirez says, “but also small enough that it felt like it existed in our world.

For now, EW has the exclusive first look at Alexandra sitting high above the New York skyline, dressed in angelic, rabbit-in-a-snowstorm white and looking up at… someone?… Or something? She has no code name and no comic-book history, but Ramirez teases that she brings an “intellectual sophistication” that matches former big bads like Daredevil‘s Wilson Fisk (Vincent D’Onofrio). In that case, may we suggest Queenpin as a moniker?

Source: ew.com

The Badass: Sigourney Weaver Still Larger Than Life

   

If you’ve ever been to the McKittrick Hotel, the site of Punchdrunk’s immersive theater (and mandatory stop for visiting relatives) Sleep No More, you know it can get creepy at night. But even on an afternoon this summer—empty of all Eyes Wide Shut masks, bellhops lip-syncing to Peggy Lee’s “Is That All There Is?” or impromptu nude dance sequence in blood baths—the McKittrick still has a looming, menacing presence. Or maybe I was just nervous. After all, I was there to meet Sigourney Weaver, and a dark, semi-abandoned haunted house might have been the wrong call. Why couldn’t I have picked a well-lit coffee shop to interview the star of all the Aliens and Ghostbusters?

If I was skittish, Weaver, already posing for photos when I tentatively tiptoed into an empty bar area, seemed entirely at ease. “Don’t let me forget, they have my meat in the freezer,” Weaver reminded no one in particular between poses. “I really can’t forget to take the meat with me when I go.” Directly following our interview, Weaver would be driving back to the Adirondacks, and the possibility of leaving the meat (never clarified as to how much there was of it, or what kind) was causing her more anxiety than a Hitchcockian faux-tel. Weaver—68 years old and 6 feet tall without heels—can make herself at home in even the most inhospitable of environments.

The notion that Sigourney Weaver is the embodiment of the “DIY and take no shit” authority figure for a generation of young women might sound, in retrospect, like a backhanded compliment. But for those of us who grew up as tomboys in the 80s, Weaver stood as shining beacon of some other way to be. While other girls wanted to be Princess Leia or Jasmine, there were always a few of us who wanted to be Ripley. Or later on, Katharine Parker in Working Girl, a woman so ahead of her time in office politicking that she managed to mash-up Claire Underwood from House of Cards and Miranda Priestly from The Devil Wears Prada, a solid two decades before either existed.

I think it’s a perfect time to be different,” Weaver tells me on the topic of beauty standards, as we slide into a dark and quiet booth in the red-curtained bar room. “I think it’s our time.” She notes her obsession with watching the Olympics. “You see the glorious range of what women look like, how strong they are. I think this is all changing on screen, as people want to see themselves reflected a little bit more. They don’t want to see some little stick figure up there all the time.

Full interview: observer.com

 

Sigourney Weaver: ‘I’m asked to play awful people all the time’

Sigourney Weaver: ‘I’m a weird duck... I was always too tall to be the girlfriend.’

Sigourney Weaver has four films coming out between now and 2022 – three Avatars and an Alien sequel – most of which have yet to be filmed, and which the 67-year-old has prepared for by cramming in as many small films as she can in advance. This is a psychological as well as an acting necessity, a way for Weaver to fine-tune before the onslaught – and which, in the case of A Monster Calls, has resulted in an almost unbearably poignant movie. The film, adapted from the Patrick Ness novel about a child who loses his mother, is so finely wrought that when Weaver first read the script, she thought, “I don’t think I can be part of this, it’s too painful. And then you realise this is your job, to tell the story.

Weaver is bright today, in a studio just outside New York, with that friendly but slightly patrician air she puts to good use in the roles she does best: the ostensible villain who isn’t all that she seems. For someone as open as Weaver, she plays repressed very well, most notably Janey in Ang Lee’s The Ice Storm, but going back as far as Katharine in Working Girl, and even to Ripley in Alien, the film that established her as an actor able to convey large internal movement via the smallest surface ripple. These roles are often characterised as “cold”, which feels to Weaver like a gendered term designed to debase their humanity. “The male perspective may be that it’s a cold person. But in fact, like in Ice Storm, Janey was disconnected: she couldn’t focus on the present and her family. Bored and lost. But I would never have gone to ‘cold’.

If she is optimistic about human nature, it is not only a requirement of her job – to inhabit another psychology requires deep levels of empathy – but of what appears to be her generous disposition. A small example: I am 30 minutes late after a train debacle, something that, with an actor of Weaver’s standing, would customarily cause upset on a par with the sky falling in, but is instead met with concern. Standing up from the lunch table to her full 6ft, and in a tweed jacket that speaks to an idea she has of England, she projects an amused frankness that she later describes, with some embarrassment that it should need to be clarified, as “normal”. One can be the sort of actor who shouts and screams and throws tantrums, but “honestly,” Weaver says, “life is too short”.

In the new movie, directed by JA Bayona and co-starring Felicity Jones and Liam Neeson, Weaver plays a woman whose adult daughter is dying of cancer; an unsympathetic figure, at least as she is seen through the eyes of her grandson. It is a fairytale of sorts, what Weaver calls “a unique blend of allegory and harsh, harsh reality”, and one that, in the context of her career in sci-fi and dystopian drama, is in some ways the most frightening landscape of all. A Monster Calls covers the triptych of worst nightmares: of a child losing a parent; of dying oneself and orphaning one’s children; and, the worst of all, suffered by Weaver’s character (and the thing that makes her tight-lipped demeanour so interesting), that of losing one’s child. “It’s not that she’s cold – it’s that she’s not sharing, because she can’t,” she says.

The film is set in England, and for reference Weaver drew on her own mother, born and raised in Essex, a graduate of Rada and the West End stage before she emigrated to New York and met Weaver’s television producer father. “She had the most beautiful speaking voice,” she says. “When I began shooting, I sometimes sounded like her. I really was uncomfortable. And I really needed to find the grandmother’s accent. It’s not a Manchester accent, but we didn’t want to be posh.” (The class setting is one of the few aspects of the film that doesn’t quite add up, though the film’s dream-like texture largely forgives it.)

Full interview: theguardian.com

Sigourney Weaver on an unexpected life in sci-fi

TORONTO (AP) — A movie has a way of sitting up straight whenever Sigourney Weaver is in it. Whether the part is small or large, she reliably jolts any film alive with her intelligence and commanding presence. She usually means business.

That, of course, has been apparent since her breakthrough role as Ellen Ripley in “Alien.” But it’s no less true of Weaver at 67. She has an almost queen-like status on today’s movie landscape, particularly in science-fiction.

She has defined one mega franchise (“Alien,” with one more on the way) and been the MVP of another (“Avatar,” with four sequels coming). Just her voice is enough to lend sci-fi credibility, whether as the ship’s voice in “WALL-E” or as the all-powerful Director in “The Cabin in the Woods.”

Weaver has been particularly ubiquitous in 2016, gracing the year’s top box-office hit, “Finding Dory,” with its best gag (her aquatic center greeting), and popping in to reprise her original role in the contentious “Ghostbusters” reboot. She was even glimpsed in Ron Howard’s “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years” as a young, rabid Beatlemaniac.

But she ends the year with “A Monster Calls,” a smaller film that uses fantasy to plumb deeper emotional depths. Directed by J.A. Bayona (who’s helming the next “Jurassic Park” film), the adaptation of Patrick Ness’ novel is about a boy coping with his mother’s terminal illness. Aside from approaching grief with uncommon seriousness, the film flips some genre tropes, including Weaver’s grandmother character.

The actress (who hasn’t lost a bit of her glamour) recently reflected on “A Monster Calls,” her re-entry to Pandora and her legacy of strong female protagonists.

AP: Your father, Sylvester ‘Pat’ Weaver was president of NBC and created the “Tonight Show.” Was it like you grew up in show business?
Weaver: At the time, I thought everyone’s father ran a network. I thought everyone got to go on the set of “Peter Pan” and meet Mary Martin. I always used to think I was going to go to school and then come home and be a different girl and go to a different house. It took me a while to realize I was stuck with me. Maybe that’s the early awareness of an actor that we’re all changeable. I remember thinking, “Gosh, I’m so amazed I’m in this body for so long.”

AP: You have such an impact on a film, regardless of how large your part is.
Weaver: I really love being part of a good story. I don’t need to be the center of the story. That’s why I really loved “A Monster Calls” because the grandmother was unlike anyone I’ve played before – not completely unlike my mother, who was British. It’s a movie I hope families go to together.

AP: Was your small role in Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall” your first film?
Weaver: Woody offered me a bigger part but I turned it down because I was in a play. I played a multiple schizophrenic who kept a hedgehog in her vagina and I wasn’t going to give that part up.

AP: “Alien” was quite a follow-up.
Weaver: It didn’t feel like a big movie to me. It felt like a very small, dark, strange movie and I could relate to that because I was used to doing very strange things off-Broadway. I thought: This is fine. This is like a workshop movie.

AP: Ripley was one of the first strong female protagonists in an action film. Is that a legacy you’re proud of?
Weaver
: I am. I’ve since read other scripts and I go, “Well that’s kind of an interesting part but I’d rather play this guy.” Because I always feel still, like in our world, there’s a lot of testosterone in some of these movies where really legitimately a woman would be involved.

AP: Do you think that’s changing?
Weaver: I think by the time your daughters are in the world, everything will be different.

AP: What did you think of the backlash to Paul Feig’s “Ghostbusters”?
Weaver: I was very surprised by it. I enjoyed the movie. I love all those women. I think Feig is brilliant. I do think it has something to do with the misogyny Trump has unearthed. I thought it was very charming. Does it also make you remember how much you loved the first one? I think so, but not to the extent that I’m going to boycott it. We’re sitting at the table. You’ve got to make room for us. We’re not going to go away.

AP: Ang Lee’s “Ice Storm” must be a film you’re particularly proud of.
Weaver: I was discussing a character I might play with someone and they said, “This woman’s cold.” I said I find that a nonsensical adjective for a woman. I’m sure you could describe Janey in “Ice Storm” as cold but she wasn’t cold. She was so disconnected from her life and bored by it.

AP: You’re soon to head into one mammoth “Avatar” production.
Weaver: The scripts for “Avatar” are absolutely incredible. I have committed to a very interesting movie about a woman (“Second Saturn”) that I hope to do in May. It’s like: This is my wonderful meal before I go into Pandora.

Source: wbal.com

‘A Monster Calls’ New York Premiere

   

Sigourney Weaver: Next ‘Avatar’ Scripts Are ‘Many Times More Amazing’ Than First One

What with the “Avatar” sequels and a villainous gig in Marvel’s upcoming Netflix series “The Defenders,” Sigourney Weaver has a lot on her plate. Her latest movie, “A Monster Calls,” co-stars Liam Neeson as a monster whose visits help a boy confront an impending loss. It The film hits U.S. theaters in January.

“A Monster Calls” seems like a very different kind of movie from blockbuster fare like “Avatar” and “Alien.”
I was looking ahead at the four “Avatar” sequels looming over me, and the idea of doing a small, intimate picture that was all about relationships was very appealing. We actually got to rehearse; we even had a read-through! To be able to hear Liam play the monster, and to have us all tell the whole story together in the same room — people don’t realize how incredibly helpful that is. You carry that with you for the whole shoot.

Your character is British. Did the accent come easily to you?
My mother was English, so I had that advantage. But I did work on the accent, because my mother went to [the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art], and she had this very beautiful, cultured English accent. I wanted to play someone who was not posh.

James Cameron has described the “Avatar” movies as a family saga. How are they shaping up?
In my opinion, the three scripts I’ve read so far are many times more amazing than the first one in terms of their scope. He did a lot of the heavy lifting in the first movie, establishing the family and the relationships and the world, and now he really gets to play.

What’s the status of the “Alien” sequel?
I hope that Neill Blomkamp and I will eventually get back to it. He’s written such a wonderful script. I look forward to finishing Ripley’s story.

What about “Defenders”?
I can’t say much, because they might kill me. I think everyone I work for might kill me if I tell you anything. But I have the most delicious character. She’s really smart, and she’s very in charge.

Source: variety.com

Sigourney Weaver Still Has Hope for Neill Blomkamp’s Alien Sequel

Yes, Alien: Covenant has us much excited, but so does the prospect of finally giving the character of Ripley the send-off that she deserves. That’s what director Neill Blomkamp has in mind for his direct sequel to Aliens, which has been put on indefinite hold until Ridley Scott finishes his Prometheus trilogy.

Star Sigourney Weaver still has high hopes for Blomkamp’s take, and she took to Variety to give fans the latest.

I hope that Neill Blomkamp and I will eventually get back to it. He’s written such a wonderful script. I look forward to finishing Ripley’s story.

Not much is known about Blomkamp’s film other than Weaver would be returning along with Michael Biehn to reprise their roles as Ellen Ripley and Corporal Dwayne Hicks.

Stay tuned and keep the faith.

Source: dreadcentral.com

Post Archive:

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4