Sigourney Weaver on an unexpected life in sci-fi

TORONTO (AP) — A movie has a way of sitting up straight whenever Sigourney Weaver is in it. Whether the part is small or large, she reliably jolts any film alive with her intelligence and commanding presence. She usually means business.

That, of course, has been apparent since her breakthrough role as Ellen Ripley in “Alien.” But it’s no less true of Weaver at 67. She has an almost queen-like status on today’s movie landscape, particularly in science-fiction.

She has defined one mega franchise (“Alien,” with one more on the way) and been the MVP of another (“Avatar,” with four sequels coming). Just her voice is enough to lend sci-fi credibility, whether as the ship’s voice in “WALL-E” or as the all-powerful Director in “The Cabin in the Woods.”

Weaver has been particularly ubiquitous in 2016, gracing the year’s top box-office hit, “Finding Dory,” with its best gag (her aquatic center greeting), and popping in to reprise her original role in the contentious “Ghostbusters” reboot. She was even glimpsed in Ron Howard’s “The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years” as a young, rabid Beatlemaniac.

But she ends the year with “A Monster Calls,” a smaller film that uses fantasy to plumb deeper emotional depths. Directed by J.A. Bayona (who’s helming the next “Jurassic Park” film), the adaptation of Patrick Ness’ novel is about a boy coping with his mother’s terminal illness. Aside from approaching grief with uncommon seriousness, the film flips some genre tropes, including Weaver’s grandmother character.

The actress (who hasn’t lost a bit of her glamour) recently reflected on “A Monster Calls,” her re-entry to Pandora and her legacy of strong female protagonists.

AP: Your father, Sylvester ‘Pat’ Weaver was president of NBC and created the “Tonight Show.” Was it like you grew up in show business?
Weaver: At the time, I thought everyone’s father ran a network. I thought everyone got to go on the set of “Peter Pan” and meet Mary Martin. I always used to think I was going to go to school and then come home and be a different girl and go to a different house. It took me a while to realize I was stuck with me. Maybe that’s the early awareness of an actor that we’re all changeable. I remember thinking, “Gosh, I’m so amazed I’m in this body for so long.”

AP: You have such an impact on a film, regardless of how large your part is.
Weaver: I really love being part of a good story. I don’t need to be the center of the story. That’s why I really loved “A Monster Calls” because the grandmother was unlike anyone I’ve played before – not completely unlike my mother, who was British. It’s a movie I hope families go to together.

AP: Was your small role in Woody Allen’s “Annie Hall” your first film?
Weaver: Woody offered me a bigger part but I turned it down because I was in a play. I played a multiple schizophrenic who kept a hedgehog in her vagina and I wasn’t going to give that part up.

AP: “Alien” was quite a follow-up.
Weaver: It didn’t feel like a big movie to me. It felt like a very small, dark, strange movie and I could relate to that because I was used to doing very strange things off-Broadway. I thought: This is fine. This is like a workshop movie.

AP: Ripley was one of the first strong female protagonists in an action film. Is that a legacy you’re proud of?
Weaver
: I am. I’ve since read other scripts and I go, “Well that’s kind of an interesting part but I’d rather play this guy.” Because I always feel still, like in our world, there’s a lot of testosterone in some of these movies where really legitimately a woman would be involved.

AP: Do you think that’s changing?
Weaver: I think by the time your daughters are in the world, everything will be different.

AP: What did you think of the backlash to Paul Feig’s “Ghostbusters”?
Weaver: I was very surprised by it. I enjoyed the movie. I love all those women. I think Feig is brilliant. I do think it has something to do with the misogyny Trump has unearthed. I thought it was very charming. Does it also make you remember how much you loved the first one? I think so, but not to the extent that I’m going to boycott it. We’re sitting at the table. You’ve got to make room for us. We’re not going to go away.

AP: Ang Lee’s “Ice Storm” must be a film you’re particularly proud of.
Weaver: I was discussing a character I might play with someone and they said, “This woman’s cold.” I said I find that a nonsensical adjective for a woman. I’m sure you could describe Janey in “Ice Storm” as cold but she wasn’t cold. She was so disconnected from her life and bored by it.

AP: You’re soon to head into one mammoth “Avatar” production.
Weaver: The scripts for “Avatar” are absolutely incredible. I have committed to a very interesting movie about a woman (“Second Saturn”) that I hope to do in May. It’s like: This is my wonderful meal before I go into Pandora.

Source: wbal.com

‘A Monster Calls’ New York Premiere

   

Sigourney Weaver: Next ‘Avatar’ Scripts Are ‘Many Times More Amazing’ Than First One

What with the “Avatar” sequels and a villainous gig in Marvel’s upcoming Netflix series “The Defenders,” Sigourney Weaver has a lot on her plate. Her latest movie, “A Monster Calls,” co-stars Liam Neeson as a monster whose visits help a boy confront an impending loss. It The film hits U.S. theaters in January.

“A Monster Calls” seems like a very different kind of movie from blockbuster fare like “Avatar” and “Alien.”
I was looking ahead at the four “Avatar” sequels looming over me, and the idea of doing a small, intimate picture that was all about relationships was very appealing. We actually got to rehearse; we even had a read-through! To be able to hear Liam play the monster, and to have us all tell the whole story together in the same room — people don’t realize how incredibly helpful that is. You carry that with you for the whole shoot.

Your character is British. Did the accent come easily to you?
My mother was English, so I had that advantage. But I did work on the accent, because my mother went to [the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art], and she had this very beautiful, cultured English accent. I wanted to play someone who was not posh.

James Cameron has described the “Avatar” movies as a family saga. How are they shaping up?
In my opinion, the three scripts I’ve read so far are many times more amazing than the first one in terms of their scope. He did a lot of the heavy lifting in the first movie, establishing the family and the relationships and the world, and now he really gets to play.

What’s the status of the “Alien” sequel?
I hope that Neill Blomkamp and I will eventually get back to it. He’s written such a wonderful script. I look forward to finishing Ripley’s story.

What about “Defenders”?
I can’t say much, because they might kill me. I think everyone I work for might kill me if I tell you anything. But I have the most delicious character. She’s really smart, and she’s very in charge.

Source: variety.com

Sigourney Weaver Still Has Hope for Neill Blomkamp’s Alien Sequel

Yes, Alien: Covenant has us much excited, but so does the prospect of finally giving the character of Ripley the send-off that she deserves. That’s what director Neill Blomkamp has in mind for his direct sequel to Aliens, which has been put on indefinite hold until Ridley Scott finishes his Prometheus trilogy.

Star Sigourney Weaver still has high hopes for Blomkamp’s take, and she took to Variety to give fans the latest.

I hope that Neill Blomkamp and I will eventually get back to it. He’s written such a wonderful script. I look forward to finishing Ripley’s story.

Not much is known about Blomkamp’s film other than Weaver would be returning along with Michael Biehn to reprise their roles as Ellen Ripley and Corporal Dwayne Hicks.

Stay tuned and keep the faith.

Source: dreadcentral.com

Dazed Magazine

Hello everyone! Sigourney had a photoshoot for Dazed Magazine. Enjoy!

Post Archive:

Page 5 of 11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 11