Sigourney Weaver to Host Lincoln Center Awards for Emerging Artists

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts has announced that two-time Golden Globe winner and Oscar and Tony nominee Sigourney Weaver will host its upcoming Lincoln Center Awards for Emerging Artists presentation on March 1. The evening will honor winners from across the performing arts, including filmmakers, musicians, and theatre artists.

Weaver joins Katherine Brown, Danny Burstein, Laura Osnes, and Desmond Richardson, who will perform at the ceremony. The awards night will be held at the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse.

The 2017 winners are Calidore String Quartet (Chamber Music Society); filmmaker Dustin Guy Defa (Film Society of Lincoln Center); soprano Kiera Duffy (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts); dancer Joseph Gordon (New York City Ballet); violinist and concertmaster Frank Huang (New York Philharmonic); violinist Paul Huang (The Juilliard School); playwright Michael R. Jackson (Lincoln Center Theater); saxophonist Julian Lee (Jazz at Lincoln Center); singer-songwriter-actress Grace McLean (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts); baritone Yunpeng Wang (The Metropolitan Opera); director, producer, and performer Ben West (The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts); and dancer Andres Zuniga (School of American Ballet).

The awardees we honor this year follow in the steps of former honorees, such as the great cellist Alisa Weilerstein, renowned choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, and Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras. The members of this class have already contributed great works of music, theater, dance, and film to the Lincoln Center campus and beyond, and we are delighted to help them pursue new projects that will undoubtedly challenge, stimulate, and inspire us,” commented William H. Donaldson, co-chair of the Emeritus Board of Lincoln Center, in a press statement.

Source: playbill.com

The Assignment Official Trailer (2017)

Dian Fossey story in production for National Geographic, Sigourney Weaver to narrate

The work of legendary gorilla scientist Dian Fossey will be brought back to life in a new three-part documentary series for National Geographic television, now in production. Scheduled to air this fall, the series will feature narration by actress Sigourney Weaver, who played Dian Fossey in the 1988 movie “Gorillas in the Mist,” based on Fossey’s book.
I had the amazing experience of portraying Dian Fossey in ‘Gorillas in the Mist,’ spending months with the majestic mountain gorillas,” says Weaver, who also serves as the honorary chair of the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund.

In the 50 years since Dian founded the Karisoke Research Center, scientists have safeguarded the gorillas and increased awareness about conservation all around the world. I am honored to be working with the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and National Geographic on what promises to be a remarkable documentary of Dian’s courageous life and legacy.
Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund President and CEO/Chief Scientist, Dr. Tara Stoinski, says there couldn’t be a better time to re-tell the story of Fossey’s work, which has since been greatly expanded and has helped the critically endangered mountain gorilla population to grow and stabilize.
The Fossey Fund has not only carried on the important gorilla protection and scientific research that Fossey started, but has expanded it to include helping local communities, building the next generation of conservationists in Africa, and helping other gorilla species in danger of extinction,” says Dr. Stoinski.
The National Geographic special will be a definitive biography of Fossey’s work, life, death and legacy, and will include never-before-seen footage from both National Geographic and Fossey Fund archives, a fitting endeavor for this 50th anniversary of her work,” adds Dr. Stoinski
In addition, the series, titled “Dian Fossey: Secrets in the Mist,” will include footage shot recently of the mountain gorillas in Rwanda and with Fossey Fund field staff. Tigress Productions, the company producing the series, is filming an historic group of gorillas who were among the first studied by Dian Fossey. Originally named Group 5, the group split in 1995, with one of the offshoots being the modern day Pablo’s group. Pablo’s group’s most famous member is elderly silverback Cantsbee – the last of the silverbacks first seen and named by Dian Fossey and then monitored throughout his 38 years. Amazingly, Cantsbee suddenly reappeared on Jan. 4, after being missing for months and presumed dead, adding yet another chapter to the amazing story of these gorillas and Fossey’s legacy.
Tigress Productions also produced the 2007 documentary on silverback Titus, which aired on PBS “Nature” in 2008.
“Dian Fossey: Secrets in the Mist” is also being produced in partnership with Academy-Award-winning executive producer James Marsh. It will air globally in 171 countries and in 45 languages this fall.

Source: gorillafund.org

 

The Defenders first look: Meet Sigourney Weaver’s villain — and learn her name

Come as you are, Defenders. There’s a new enemy in town.

Meet Sigourney Weaver’s Alexandra, the villain of Marvel’s The Defenders impressive enough to draw the attention of Daredevil (Charlie Cox), Jessica Jones (Krysten Ritter), Luke Cage (Mike Colter), and Iron Fist (Finn Jones). She’s an “utter badass,” showrunner Marco Ramirez says of the character, who is the perfect fit for the Sigourney Weaver, of Alien and Avatar fame. “Sigourney is the kind of person you can buy as the smartest person in the room, who you can also buy as a person holding a flamethrower. Her character is a very powerful force in New York City. She’s everything Sigourney is: sophisticated, intellectual, dangerous.” He pauses. “I’m sorry. I can only say a bunch of adjectives right now.

A flurry of adjectives sounds about right for Alexandra, and not just because Marvel’s keeping further details about her character under tight wraps, so much so that probing Ramirez for more on Weaver’s character is like trying to stick a needle through Luke Cage’s unbreakable skin. After all, she (or whatever she’s fighting for) has to walk a very difficult, spoiler-ific line when it comes to the team-up series. “We knew it would take something massive to pull these four characters from their individual worlds to work together,” Ramirez says, “but also small enough that it felt like it existed in our world.

For now, EW has the exclusive first look at Alexandra sitting high above the New York skyline, dressed in angelic, rabbit-in-a-snowstorm white and looking up at… someone?… Or something? She has no code name and no comic-book history, but Ramirez teases that she brings an “intellectual sophistication” that matches former big bads like Daredevil‘s Wilson Fisk (Vincent D’Onofrio). In that case, may we suggest Queenpin as a moniker?

Source: ew.com

The Badass: Sigourney Weaver Still Larger Than Life

   

If you’ve ever been to the McKittrick Hotel, the site of Punchdrunk’s immersive theater (and mandatory stop for visiting relatives) Sleep No More, you know it can get creepy at night. But even on an afternoon this summer—empty of all Eyes Wide Shut masks, bellhops lip-syncing to Peggy Lee’s “Is That All There Is?” or impromptu nude dance sequence in blood baths—the McKittrick still has a looming, menacing presence. Or maybe I was just nervous. After all, I was there to meet Sigourney Weaver, and a dark, semi-abandoned haunted house might have been the wrong call. Why couldn’t I have picked a well-lit coffee shop to interview the star of all the Aliens and Ghostbusters?

If I was skittish, Weaver, already posing for photos when I tentatively tiptoed into an empty bar area, seemed entirely at ease. “Don’t let me forget, they have my meat in the freezer,” Weaver reminded no one in particular between poses. “I really can’t forget to take the meat with me when I go.” Directly following our interview, Weaver would be driving back to the Adirondacks, and the possibility of leaving the meat (never clarified as to how much there was of it, or what kind) was causing her more anxiety than a Hitchcockian faux-tel. Weaver—68 years old and 6 feet tall without heels—can make herself at home in even the most inhospitable of environments.

The notion that Sigourney Weaver is the embodiment of the “DIY and take no shit” authority figure for a generation of young women might sound, in retrospect, like a backhanded compliment. But for those of us who grew up as tomboys in the 80s, Weaver stood as shining beacon of some other way to be. While other girls wanted to be Princess Leia or Jasmine, there were always a few of us who wanted to be Ripley. Or later on, Katharine Parker in Working Girl, a woman so ahead of her time in office politicking that she managed to mash-up Claire Underwood from House of Cards and Miranda Priestly from The Devil Wears Prada, a solid two decades before either existed.

I think it’s a perfect time to be different,” Weaver tells me on the topic of beauty standards, as we slide into a dark and quiet booth in the red-curtained bar room. “I think it’s our time.” She notes her obsession with watching the Olympics. “You see the glorious range of what women look like, how strong they are. I think this is all changing on screen, as people want to see themselves reflected a little bit more. They don’t want to see some little stick figure up there all the time.

Full interview: observer.com

 

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